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art-of-swords:

Handmade Swords - Earil

  • By Peter Lyon of Weta Workshop
  • Edition Size: 1
  • Measurements: Blade length: 915mm (36”). Overall length: 1217mm (48”). Weight: 1.94Kg (4 pounds 4 ounces). Balance point: 71mm (2.8”) along blade, measured from the shoulder of the blade

The sword has been made especially for the Weta Cave and Weta’s Online Shop to sell to the public. It is similar to late medieval European longswords, but with design flourishes transform it into a piece of art as well. A longsword is light enough and balanced to be used with one hand, but it can also be used two handed for powerful cutting blows. The blade is broad for much of its length, making for strong cuts, but comes to an acute point for effective thrusts, making this a true cut-and-thrust sword.

The individual parts have shapes and detail lines that blend into each other and continue into the next component, so that shapes continue even as the materials change, and the shapes of all the hilt parts draw the eye towards the diamond shaped bosses in the centre of the grip, filled with polished Paua (New Zealand abalone) shell each side. At the same time there is a strong central line through the hilt and along the blade, emphasising the straight and symmetrical shapes of the sword.

This sword has many nautical features which led me to the name, “Aearil”, which in Elvish means “Gleaming Ocean”. 

The straight blade is ground from spring steel bar, and has been heat treated to give the best possible combination of toughness and edge hardness. Historically blades were forged into shape and to remove flaws in the steel, but the consistency and high specifications of modern steels mean this is no longer necessary.

The bevelled edge is blunted for safety and display, but could just as easily be sharpened for cutting tests. The tang of the blade is strong and wide, and passes through the cross guard, grip and pommel, and is peened over the end of the pommel for maximum strength.

The cross guard is cut from a block of mild steel. From the centre block it projects along the blade and towards the ends, which are split into a fork. This is an unusual feature which I don’t recall being used on a sword before. The cross is set onto the shoulders of the blade for extra strength and stability, as was done on medieval European swords to prevent the cross becoming loose and rattling through use.

The grip is made of beech wood, covered with leather. Thin cords under the leather create the designs, and the leather has been carefully tooled to fit into all the shapes created by the cords. The grip was mostly drilled out then fitted by heating the tang and burning out the remaining wood for a tight fit, and finally glued in place. It is a two handed grip; the foregrip is straight to give a strong gripping surface, while the waisted shape of the upper grip encourages the second hand to nestle into the inside curves of the pommel.

The mild steel pommel is also a counterweight for the blade. It is shaped somewhat like a fish tail, with curved and recessed faces to add interesting shapes, and also to remove weight and get the best possible balance for the sword overall. The pommel was set tight onto the tapering tang before the end was peened over.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Weta Ltd.

theorthodoxbritreturns:

Just seen this post going around Facebook and others. I thought it is best to clear up the historical inaccuracy.

1) The Early Church called this Festival Pascha (The welsh still call is Pasg) and Easter was not a name chosen by Constantine but is a later Western invention (From Anglo-Saxon and not Isthar) Most Christian communities still call it Pascha, which it would have been known as Constantine himself (Greek speaker). We can therefore conclude that he wouldn’t have even known the festival by the name Easter, which destroys this Hypothesis completely.

2) Many Theories as to the Origins of the name “Easter” exist and m
ost scholars believe that Easter gets its name from Germanic. There is no evidence that this derives at all from Ishtar and her symbols were not eggs and rabbits but a gateway, an own and a Lion (Look at the carving behind the writing!) No reputable Scholar has put the theory of a link between her and Easter forward with supporting facts due to the clear lack of any significant link.

3) The celebration existed long before Constantine Legalised Christianity. The Quatrodeciman controversy was a discussion of over the date the Celebration of this festival as the Western and Eastern Bishoprics calculated it differently. This occurred close to 200 years before Constantine. Therefore, his influence on the date of the Festival was non-existent as it had been discussed by the Church already.

4) The 2nd Century Apologist Melito of Sardis wrote the famed Treatise ‘On Pascha’ to be read at the festival, which existed in the 2nd century. Again, this shows that there was an Easter before Constantine.

To suggest that celebrating Easter is a ‘Constantine Pagan influence’ is to plea historical ignorance and ignore basic Christian History. All anyone needs to do is pick up a History book to see these facts.

Christians have celebrated this with a the Feast of the Resurrection since the 1st Century, do not let groups like these wipe out historical fact in order to condemn their straw man version of the Apostolic Faith.

ohhowlucky:

danteogodofsoup:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

standupcomedyblog:

John Mulaney | The Salt & Pepper Diner

THE BEST JOKE IN EXISTENCE

GOD I JUST TOLD SOMEONE ABOUT THIS STORY

This is one of the best pieces of comedy that I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing. I love this. I have been looking for this online for awhile.

(Source: timetoputonashow)

science-junkie:

The Astro Alphabet
By Ethan Siege

A is for Aurora, the Earth’s polar lights,
as the Sun’s hot electrons help color our nights.

B is for Black Hole, a star’s collapsed heart,
if you cross its horizon, you’ll never depart.

C is for Comet, with tails, ice, and dust,
a trip near the Sun makes skywatching a must!

D is for Dark Matter, the great cosmic glue
that holds clusters together, but not me and you!

E is for Eclipse, where the Moon, Earth and Sun
cast light-blocking shadows that can’t be outrun.

F is for Fusion, that powers the stars,
as nuclei join, their released light is ours!

G is for Galaxies, in groups and alone,
house billions of planets with lifeforms unknown.

H is for Hubble, for whom Earth’s no place;
a telescope like this belongs up in space.

I is for Ions, making nebulae glow;
as they find electrons, we capture the show.

J is for Jets, from a galaxy’s core,
if you feed them right, they’ll be active once more!

K is for Kepler, whose great laws of motion
keep planets on course in the great cosmic ocean.

L is for Libration, which makes our Moon rock,
it’s a trick of the orbit; it’s tidally locked!

M is for Meteors, which come in a shower,
if skies are just right, you’ll see hundreds an hour!

N is for Nebula, what forms when stars die,
this recycled fuel makes cosmic apple pie.

O is for Opaque, why the Milky Way’s dark,
these cosmic dust lanes make starlight appear stark!

P is for Pulsar, a spinning neutron star,
as the orbits tick by, we know just when we are.

Q is for Quasar, a great radio source,
accelerating matter with little remorse.

R is for Rings, all gas giants possess them,
even one found in another sun’s system!

S is for Spacetime, which curves due to matter,
this Universe-fabric can bend but won’t shatter!

T is for Tides, caused by gravity’s tune,
our oceans bulge out from the Sun and the Moon.

U is the Universe, our goal’s understanding,
with billions of galaxies, as spacetime’s expanding!

V is for Virgo, our nearest great cluster,
with thousands of galaxies, it’s a gut-buster!

W is for Wavelength, the energies of light,
that tell us what atoms are in stars just from sight!

X is for X-rays, high-energy light,
where bursts of new stars show an ionized might.

Y is the Year, where we orbit our Sun,
each planet’s is different; the Earth’s is just one.

Z is for Zenith, so gaze up at the sky!
The Universe is here; let’s learn what, how and why.

Source: Starts With A Bang!
Image credit: Galaxy Zoo’s writing tool

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